News > Research

28th February 2020

New Treatment Fund cuts average access time for new medicines from 90 to 13 days

As it hits its three-year milestone, Welsh Government’s £80 million New Treatment Fund has cut the average time it takes for newly-recommended medicines to become available to patients by 85%, from 90 to 13 days. The Fund is speeding up access to life-improving and life-saving new treatments through annual £16 million grants to Wales’ Health…

24th February 2020

Jellyfish collagen 3D systems support ovarian cancer cell line proliferation, confirming its suitability for advanced cell culturing applications and provides an excellent alternative to mammalian collagen sources for the culture of human cells

Jellyfish collagen sustains and supports ovarian cancer (OvCa) cell attachment, proliferation, morphology and epithelial to mesenchymal transition markers. Jellyfish collagen is tuneable and non-cytotoxic to (OvCa) cells and can be functionalized to mimic the cancer microenvironment. Adopting jellyfish as a collagen source is sustainable and cheaper than the golden standard material sources derived from mammals…

23rd February 2020

Double success for University drug resistance research

Swansea University research into the threat posed by antifungal drug resistance has been highlighted in two prestigious international journals. Fungal disease now kills more people than malaria or TB and the Centre for Disease Control in the USA recognises emergence of multi-drug resistance in fungi as a high level threat. Dr Josie Parker and Prof…

23rd February 2020

University’s new course gets set to revive city’s pharmacy training tradition

Plans for the launch of Swansea University’s new pharmacy degree programme are now well under way but it won’t be the first time future pharmacists have been trained in the city The University, which is celebrating its centenary this year, is putting the finishing touches to its new MPharm degree which begins in 2021 – 91…

23rd February 2020

Welsh Meditech Firm Joins Fight to Control Coronavirus

Digital technology developed in Wales could play a leading part in helping doctors stem the spread of the coronavirus epidemic. A Cardiff-based medical technology company, Bond Digital Health, has joined the global effort to tackle the Covid-19 outbreak which has so far claimed more than 2,000 lives. Bond has joined an international consortium led by…

27th January 2020

University joins philanthropist’s quest to understand why some patients stay free from cancer after treatment

Eminent philanthropist and three-time cancer survivor James Hull has joined forces with six universities across the country to investigate why cancer returns in some people and not others. Focusing on patients who have had successful treatment of advanced cancer and in whom the cancer has not reoccurred for at least five years, researchers from Swansea…

21st January 2020

Australian hospital leads the world with patient monitoring trial

A patient being monitored by the Isansys Patient Status Engine at the 20-bed Kilcoy hospital in rural Queensland An Australian hospital has become the first in the world to use wireless monitoring technology hospital-wide, revolutionising its approach to the most basic process in healthcare – taking and recording patients’ vital signs. The trial of the…

06th January 2020

New study shows how patients’ health values can impact vital pelvic floor treatment

Researchers and health professionals in Swansea have revealed the value women put on their own health can have a direct effect on the success of medical treatment for pelvic floor problems. Pelvic floor dysfunction affects more than a quarter of all women in the UK.  It can involve incontinence and prolapse, and can be treated…

06th January 2020

New research shows domestic animals link virus spread among humans and wildlife

Our domesticated animals – both pets and livestock – hold the key to the spread of viruses among humans and wildlife according to new research involving Swansea University. However, the study has revealed the patterns of how viruses are shared between humans and wildlife species differs between the two major groups of RNA and DNA…

09th December 2019

Irish Consul General’s praise for life sciences partnership

The Irish Consul General to Wales has visited Swansea University Medical School for a special briefing about the Celtic Advanced Life Science Innovation Network (CALIN). Denise Harahan was welcomed to the University by Vice-Chancellor Paul Boyle and CALIN directors Shareen Doak and Steve Conlan and deputy director Gareth Healey. Established in 2016, CALIN is an…